How to Properly Onboard Your New Employees

Making a strong first impression and properly integrating a new hire into a new position is imperative if you wish to inspire loyalty and high morale in new employees.

Often, businesses may be forced to terminate an employee immediately or an employee may leave a business without giving the business ample time to replace the departing employee. In these cases, it can be tempting to forego the traditional on-boarding process in an effort to fill the vacant spot as quickly as possible.

If you’re interested in promoting peak performance and encouraging loyalty and high morale amongst your staff, then it’s important to make sure that your employees know that you’re invested in them and their success. Here are some best practices on how to properly on-board an employee:

A Proper Introduction  

            The first step of the on-boarding process should involve a formal introduction and meet-and-greet with direct managers, coworkers, peripheral staff and, if possible, having a high level executive take the time to meet each new hire.

Policies, Procedures and Company Values

            At an early stage in the on-boarding process, it is important to set the right expectations for new hires. Take some time to highlight important policies, standard procedures, expectations.

In addition to highlighting key policies and procedures, be sure to give your employees a copy of the employee handbook that they can peruse or reference at their leisure.

Training

            It is essential that your new hires feel confident that they will be able to perform the job that you need them to do. There is, however, only so much that a person will be able to absorb through training.

What’s most important is that you follow up with employees regularly in the weeks and months following training to make sure that they are acclimating to the position.

Successful on-boarding cannot be done in a 2-3 weeks. Proper on-boarding should last a year.

Easy Time Clock ™   is a cloud-based time and attendance system that provides a comprehensive, accurate, and affordable solution allowing employees to clock in and out with a computer, mobile device, or biometric reader.

How to Deal With Employees’ Requests for Raises

As an employer, you control the financial well-being of your employees. When it comes down to the finances of the company, it is often finding the balance between what is best for the company and what is best for its workers. For example, look at benefits that employers offer to their employees such as dental insurance. These are costs to the business that exist for the purpose of better retaining employees. By retaining the workers, the company is able to make more money by reducing turnover.

Keeping this in mind, an employee comes into your office requesting a raise. The final decision is up to you as the employer, so it is important that you weigh the relevant factors and proceed in a logical manner to the employee’s request.

Listen to what the Employee Wants

An important first step in response to the employee is to listen to their entire request and ask questions to gain further information. Why are they requesting this raise? When was the last time this employee received a raise? By gaining related information as to why this request is coming to you in the first place, you are better able to respond with a solution everyone will be satisfied with. Cutting off the employee without actually listening to their request is the quickest way to make them feel they are not valued at the business, and they will likely look for work elsewhere. 

Consider what the Employee Brings to the Table 

This stage is where you evaluate the employee to decide if they should receive the requested raise. This stage asks a lot of questions about the employee and their relationship to the company. Has it been enough time since their last raise that the request feels justified? Have they been outperforming their coworkers? What does the employee contribute to the company financially? What does the employee bring to the business other than finances? These are the types of questions you should ask yourself to evaluate whether or not the employee should get a raise.  By conducting an internal or official performance evaluation of the employee, you are better able to make an informed decision. 

Consider what May Happen if You Say No 

If you are unsure if you should give your employee the raise, ask yourself what could happen if you deny the request. Will the employee still want to stay with the company? If the employee was asking for the raise for personal reasons, will their personal lives affect their quality of work? Will it cost more to replace the employee than to give them the raise? These types of questions can help guarantee you have come to a conclusion you are satisfied with no matter how the employee may respond.

Be Honest 

Being honest with your employee is crucial, especially if the answer is no. Be careful not to say that you will take it under consideration if you have already come to a firm conclusion. If your response to their request is no, you should most likely explain why. If the employee can earn that raise by doing more, try explaining that to them. By maintaining honesty with your employee, you are more likely to get a satisfying conclusion for everyone.

Be Willing to Negotiate 

Sometimes the business can’t afford the full raise that the employee is requesting. Be willing to negotiate with your employee. If they are asking for raise x and you can only afford amount y, then negotiate with the employee so that everyone walks away with a satisfying result.

Conclusion

Employers hold the financial stability of everyone involved with the company. Being fair to your employees is important. If you are a business owner and an employee come into your office asking for a raise, remember to hear them out, consider what they bring to the table, what may happen if you say no, to always be honest, and be willing to negotiate. By keeping these factors in mind, both you and the employee are more likely to achieve a satisfying result.

Easy Time Clock ™   is a cloud-based time and attendance system that provides a comprehensive, accurate, and affordable solution allowing employees to clock in and out with a computer, mobile device, or biometric reader.

Reacting v. Responding in Difficult Employer Situations

Employers often have to make tough decisions based on certain situations that may arise in the company. When interacting with employees, the employer must balance what is best for the company and what is best for the people within that company. An excellent method for achieving the optimal result in these types of situations is to respond rather than react. By highlighting the difference between the two and applying this method to specific situations, an employer can see the benefit of always responding versus reacting. 

The Difference Between the Two

While seeming similar, there is a large difference in the exemplification of reacting and responding. A reaction is instantaneous. Reactions are based on beliefs, biases, and prejudices of the subconscious mind. Think of the phrase ‘knee-jerk reaction’. When you say or do something without thinking, usually tied to emotions such as anger or guilt, that is an example of a reaction. Reactions are made in the moment and do not take into account the long-term effects of what you do or say.

Responding, on the other hand, comes from the result of thoughtfulness, reflection, and consideration of the relevant factors involved in the situation. It weighs the long-term effects and more accurately represents what you believe is best to achieve the balance between the worker and the business. Understanding the difference between responding and reacting and applying that too difficult employer situations can create more favorable outcomes for your company.

Upset Employees 

For the first example, an employee comes into their employer’s office upset about issue x and is threatening to quit. This is never news that an employer wants to hear. An employer could react in various ways: tell them to leave, get defensive, shrug the news off nonchalantly, etc. These are examples of immediate, emotional reactions that an employer may find themselves showing if they do not watch themselves.

Instead, the employer should aim to respond thoughtfully to the upset employee. Asking questions, gaining information, and looking for solutions are examples of positive responses to give. Or, on the flip-side, if the best response is to let the employee leave, then that is acceptable as long as it came from an area of thought and not a knee-jerk reaction.

Low Performance

An employee has been underperforming in their duties and it is hurting the finances of the company. Reactions to this include immediately calling the employee into the office and scolding them, financially threatening them, firing them, etc. Responses take more time to craft, however. Think about if the employee brings more to the company than pure financial gains. Consider if they bring a sense of humor or morale to the rest of the team. After taking notable factors into account, the employer should call the employee into the office and talk to them and figure out what solution is going to be best for the business and the employee.

Conclusion

Employers make important decisions that affect the livelihoods of those around them, most notably the employees. By taking the time to respond rather than react, an employer is better able to control their direct actions in difficult situations and achieve optimal results. If you are a business owner and find yourself in a difficult employer situation, remember to respond rather than react in order to achieve the best results for both the company and your employees.

Easy Time Clock ™   is a cloud-based time and attendance system that provides a comprehensive, accurate, and affordable solution allowing employees to clock in and out with a computer, mobile device, or biometric reader.

Easy Time Clocks CEO Nominated for 3 Horizon Awards

Our CEO, Alisha Allen Gardner, was nominated for not one but three Awards with the Oklahoma City Young Professionals Horizon Awards. The nominations include-

The Impact Award for volunteer of the year, Member of the Year, and the Chairman’s Award

Check back in August to see who won!

Mary Williams and Alisha Allen Gardner declares the 2018 OKCYP Horizon Awards officially 'girls night!' Mary and Alisha leads with the most nominations this year alongside Lori Harless. Make sure to purchase your tickets now for young professionals biggest night! You have until July 15th before the 'early bird special' ends!Purchase tickets here ——> https://www.okcyp.com/event-2876102

Posted by OKC Young Professionals on Tuesday, June 12, 2018

 

Rob is our COO over here at Easy Time Clock. He has some valuable information on his new leadership series! Step 1- Be an Influencer!

Rob Allen!!! Listen to Rob as he shares his story and inspires you to be an INFLUENCER!

Posted by Beth Upchurch Allen on Tuesday, April 10, 2018

What Distinguishes Project Managing from Micromanaging?

A project manager is required to ensure that employees stay focused and on schedule. A project manager is required to motivate employees and to drive a project toward its completion. There comes a tipping point, however, where project management becomes micromanagement and the expected value of having a project overseer becomes negative. Management is a balancing act; finding the perfect equilibrium between micromanaging and not managing at all can lead to success for the entire team. Leaning too far one way or the other is a certain recipe for losing your team all together.

Project Management Versus Micromanagement

A project manager is responsible for assigning individual tasks and corresponding due dates to members of the team. It is also the responsibility of the project manager to ensure that each individual team member is qualified and able to complete their designated tasks.

Micromanaging, however, describes the close involvement of the supervisor with team members. In order for the project to make it through to completion in a timely fashion, micromanagers feel that they need to be involved, in great detail, with each individual aspect of the project.

Pros and Cons

Despite the poor reputation, loose micromanagement could be beneficial for on-boarding new employees. New employees may benefit from having a supervisor nearby who can answer questions or explain processes. If new policies or procedures are put in place, it may benefit even experienced employees to have a supervisor nearby to ensure that a project is completed in a timely fashion and in correspondence with new rules or procedures.

The downside to micromanaging is that it can hinder the speedy completion of a project or, in some cases, it can inhibit the ideal results of the project. For example, if a micromanager has a specific methodology that disallows brainstorming or the possibility of creating a new process, then that micromanager may never achieve the best possible results from a project and customers may ultimately suffer the consequences.

Rule of Thumb

 As a project manager, there will always be multiple tasks that you are going to need to juggle at one time. You should prioritize where your attention should go by where it’s needed most. If you have successfully staffed a group of competent individuals that you trust to complete the project on time without your detailed involvement in each individual process, then there’s no need to micromanage every team member or aspect of a project.

Easy Time Clock ™   is a cloud-based time and attendance system that provides a comprehensive, accurate, and affordable solution allowing employees to clock in and out with a computer, mobile device, or biometric reader.

Oklahoma City Young Professionals Horizon Awards Chariman Award nominees

2018 Chairman's Award Nomineees

Surprise! We’re announcing the nominees for the 2018 Chairman’s Award!

Posted by OKC Young Professionals on Thursday, March 29, 2018

The 2018 Chairman’s Award Nominees are Lori Harless-Oklahoma City University, Jacob Simon-Emersons Commercial Real Estate, Mary Williams with First Enterprise Bank, Tim Robertson with Validated Construction and our CEO-Alisha Allen Gardner.